Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility

Overview

What is malignant hyperthermia?

Malignant hyperthermia is a genetic condition that causes a severe reaction to many anesthetics and muscle relaxants. When exposed to specific medications, people with malignant hyperthermia may experience muscle rigidity, breakdown of muscle fibers (rhabdomyolysis), a high fever, and a rapid heart rate resulting from an inability to regulate calcium levels in muscles. Without prompt treatment, the complications of malignant hyperthermia can be life-threatening.

References
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Are there other names for malignant hyperthermia?

How common is malignant hyperthermia?

What is the usual abbreviation for malignant hyperthermia?

What is malignant hyperthermia susceptibility?

What type of disease is malignant hyperthermia?

Do certain populations have higher incidence of malignant hyperthermia?

Is malignant hyperthermia more common in men or women?

Are there other names for malignant hyperthermia?

Malignant hyperthermia is also known as malignant hyperpyrexia or anesthesia related hyperthermia.

References
How common is malignant hyperthermia?

Malignant hyperthermia occurs in 1 in 5,000 to 50,000 people. Malignant hyperthermia may be more common than the formally reported incidence, because many people with this condition may be never exposed to drugs that trigger a reaction and therefore remain undiagnosed. One study estimated there are more than 1,000 cases of MH in the US each year.

References
  • Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility. [Internet]. Gene Reviews [updated January 31, 2013]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1146/.
  • Brandom BW, Muldoon SM. Estimation of the Incidence of Malignant Hyperthermia Using a Capture-Recapture Method in the USA. Abstract A1267. Las Vegas, NV: American Society of Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting. 2004.
  • Malignant hyperthermia. [Internet]. Genetics Home Reference. [Reviewed January 2020 ].Available from: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/malignant-hyperthermia
What is the usual abbreviation for malignant hyperthermia?

Malignant hyperthermia is typically abbreviated as MH. Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility is abbreviated as MHS.

References
  • Malignant hyperthermia. [Internet]. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [updated March 2, 2017].Available from: https://www.omim.org/entry/145600
  • Malignant hyperthermia. [Internet]. Genetics Home Reference. [Reviewed January 2020 ].Available from: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/malignant-hyperthermia
What is malignant hyperthermia susceptibility?

People at increased risk for this malignant hyperthermia are said to have malignant hyperthermia susceptibility. Often times, affected individuals may never know for sure they have the malignant hyperthermia unless they undergo confirmatory testing or have a severe reaction to anesthesia during a surgical procedure. If they have a family history of malignant hyperthermia or their doctors suspected marker hyperthermia during surgery, they are referred to as having malignant hyperthermia susceptibility.

References
  • Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility. [Internet]. Gene Reviews [updated January 31, 2013]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1146/.
  • Malignant hyperthermia. [Internet]. Genetics Home Reference. [Reviewed January 2020 ].Available from: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/malignant-hyperthermia
What type of disease is malignant hyperthermia?

Malignant hyperthermia is a skeletal muscle disorder. If affects the muscles that are involved in movement.

References
  • Malignant hyperthermia. [Internet]. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [updated March 2, 2017].Available from: https://www.omim.org/entry/145600
  • Malignant hyperthermia. [Internet]. Genetics Home Reference. [Reviewed January 2020 ].Available from: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/malignant-hyperthermia
Do certain populations have higher incidence of malignant hyperthermia?

While the international incidence of malignant hyperthermia is generally thought to be 1 in 50,000 anesthetics, children are at higher risk, with approximately 1 in 5,000 to 10,000 per pediatric anesthetics. A higher incidence is also reported in certain geographically defined populations, such as residents of north-central Wisconsin, aboriginal inhabitants of North Carolina, valley dwellers in parts of Austria, and descendants of settlers in Quebec.

References
  • Malignant hyperthermia. [Internet]. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [updated March 2, 2017].Available from: https://www.omim.org/entry/145600
  • King, J. O., Denborough, M. A. Anesthetic-induced malignant hyperthermia in children. J. Pediat. 83: 37-40, 1973. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4149045
  • Malignant hyperthermia. [Internet]. Genetics Home Reference. [Reviewed January 2020 ].Available from: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/malignant-hyperthermia
Is malignant hyperthermia more common in men or women?

There are more men reported to have malignant hyperthermia compared to women. Demographic data on age and sex distribution of patients referred for malignant hyperthermia testing indicates that 68% are males and 32% are females.

References
  • Malignant hyperthermia. [Internet]. National Disorders of Rare Diseases [updated 2013]. Available from: https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/malignant-hyperthermia/
  • Malignant hyperthermia of anesthesia. [Internet]. Orphanet [updated February 2015]. Available from: https://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?Lng=EN&Expert=423
  • Malignant hyperthermia. [Internet]. Genetics Home Reference. [Reviewed January 2020 ].Available from: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/malignant-hyperthermia

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