Hydatidiform mole

Treatment

What is the treatment for a hydatidiform mole or molar pregnancy?

Hydatidiform moles are usually treated by a type of doctor called an obstetrician and gynecologist (OB/GYN). Usually, a surgical procedure called a dilation and curettage (D&C) will be recommended. In a D&C, the tissue lining the uterus is removed through the vagina. The mole is embedded in this tissue and is also removed. This procedure does not damage the uterus. A woman can still have children if they have had this procedure. Rarely, a hysterectomy may need to be performed. In a hysterectomy, the entire uterus is removed. After surgery, the pregnancy hormone called hCG is measured several times. The level of hCG is high when there is a molar pregnancy. When this level goes back to normal, no more treatment is needed. Sometimes the hCG level does not return to normal. This is called persistent disease. Additional testing may be needed to make sure that it has not developed into a type of cancer called choriocarcinoma. Chemotherapy drugs may be needed to treat persistent disease. If the mole has developed into cancer, then multiple chemotherapies may be needed. A woman should wait 6-12 months to become pregnant again after a molar pregnancy has been removed. The hydatidiform mole may occur again if pregnancy occurs too soon after removal. Talk to your doctor about what treatment is best for you. To find an obstetrician near you, use the Find an OB-Gyn tool on the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists website.

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What is a Dilation and Curettage (D&C)?

Do I have to have a Dilation and Curettage (D&C) surgical procedure for a partial molar pregnancy?

What happens after a hydatidiform mole is removed?

What is a Dilation and Curettage (D&C)?

Dilation and Curettage (D&C) is a surgical procedure. It can be used to end pregnancies, remove tissue following a miscarriage, or remove uterine tissue to treat different conditions. During this procedure, the cervix is opened, or dilated. The cervix is the opening to the uterus located at the back of the vagina. After dilation, a small instrument is inserted into the uterus through the cervix to remove tissue. This instrument is called a curette. It is used to scrape the tissue lining the uterus. Removal of this tissue does not damage the uterus. A woman having this procedure can still have children in the future. Talk to your doctor to learn more about this procedure. It is usually performed by a type of doctor called an obstetrician. To find an obstetrician near you, use the Find an OB-Gyn tool on the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists website.

Do I have to have a Dilation and Curettage (D&C) surgical procedure for a partial molar pregnancy?

In rare cases, a partial molar pregnancy can continue. However, these are considered extremely high-risk pregnancies. Women who continue these pregnancies are at increased risks for problems. These problems include: bleeding, blood pressure problems, miscarriage or early delivery. In most cases, the pregnancy will not survive to delivery. In very rare cases, a live birth may occur. However, these infants die shortly after birth. It is important to discuss these risks with your doctor carefully. Talk to your doctor about your options for treatment. To find an obstetrician near you, use the Find an OB-Gyn tool on the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists website.

What happens after a hydatidiform mole is removed?

After surgery, the pregnancy hormone called hCG is measured several times. The level of hCG is high when there is a molar pregnancy. When this level goes back to normal, no more treatment is needed. Sometimes the hCG level does not return to normal. This is called persistent disease. Additional testing may be needed to make sure that it has not developed into a type of cancer called choriocarcinoma. Talk to your doctor about your options for treatment. To find an obstetrician near you, use the Find an OB-Gyn tool on the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists website.

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