Fetal varicella syndrome

Overview

What is Fetal Varicella Syndrome?

Fetal Varicella Syndrome is a group of birth defects that can include scars on the skin, eye problems, poor growth, underdevelopment of an arm or leg, small head size, delayed development and intellectual disability. Some babies will only have one of the problems, while others have some, or all. These defects occur as a result of an infection with the virus that causes chicken pox, called Varicella zoster.

References
  • http://mothertobaby.org/fact-sheets/chicken-pox-varicella-vaccine-pregnancy/pdf/
  • Mandelbrot L; Fetal varicella – diagnosis, management, and outcome; Prenatal Diagnosis 2012, 32, 511–518
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Are there other names for Fetal Varicella Syndrome?

How common is Fetal Varicella Syndrome?

Are there other names for Fetal Varicella Syndrome?

Congenital varicella syndrome, fetal varicella zoster syndrome, fetal varicella-herpes zoster syndrome, and varicella embryopathy are all other names for fetal varicella syndrome.

References
  • http://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/congenital-varicella-syndrome/
How common is Fetal Varicella Syndrome?

Fetal varicella syndrome is rare. The condition occurs in about 1% of babies whose mothers were diagnosed with chicken pox during pregnancy. Only about 1-10 of every 10,000 pregnant women are affected with chicken pox. Exposure is most dangerous when it occurs prior to 20 weeks gestation. After 20 weeks, the risk is lower.

References
  • http://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/congenital-varicella-syndrome/
  • Mandelbrot L, Fetal varicella – diagnosis, management, and outcome; Prenatal Diagnosis 2012, 32, 511–518

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