Fetal trimethadione syndrome

Overview

What is fetal trimethadione syndrome?

Fetal trimethadione syndrome is a collection of birth defects that occur when a mother takes the medication trimethadione (brand name Tridione®) during pregnancy.

Most people take trimethadione to treat their petite mal or absence seizures. It is important that you do not stop taking trimethadione on your own without talking to your doctor. Having seizures during pregnancy can lead to other health issues for you and your baby.

References
  • http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?Lng=GB&Expert=1913
  • https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a601127.html
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Are there other names for fetal trimethadione syndrome?

What is Trimethadione as it relates to fetal trimethadone syndrome?

How many individuals does fetal trimethadione syndrome affect?

How likely is it that exposure to trimethadione will result in birth defects?

Are there other names for fetal trimethadione syndrome?

Fetal trimethadione syndrome is also known as paramethadione syndrome, tridione syndrome, or German syndrome.

References
  • Lietman, Paul S., et al. "The fetal trimethadione syndrome." The Journal of pediatrics 87.2 (1975): 280-284.
What is Trimethadione as it relates to fetal trimethadone syndrome?

Trimethadione (brand name Tridione®) is a medication used to control seizures when other medications will not work. Trimethadione is in a class of medications known as anticonvulsants. It works by reducing abnormal electrical activity in the brain.

References
  • https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a601127.html
How many individuals does fetal trimethadione syndrome affect?

Trimethadione was prescribed to treat epilepsy and seizures during the 1970s. After these prescriptions were taken, reports of congenital birth defects and malformations began to surface. It was found that over 50 pregnancies had been exposed to trimethadione, with a majority of those pregnancies ending in fetal loss or congenital birth defects. Since the 1970s, there have been no reported cases of fetal trimethadione syndrome.

References
  • http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/550945
  • Rischbieth, R. H. "Troxidone (trimethadione) embryopathy: case report with review of the literature." Clinical and experimental neurology 16 (1978): 251-256.
How likely is it that exposure to trimethadione will result in birth defects?

According to a study from 1977, of a reported 53 pregnancies exposed to trimethadione, up to 87% of these pregnancies resulted in fetal loss or congenital birth defects.

References
  • http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/412416
  • Feldman, Gerald L., David D. Weaver, and Everett W. Lovrien. "The fetal trimethadione syndrome: report of an additional family and further delineation of this syndrome." American Journal of Diseases of Children 131.12 (1977): 1389-1392.

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