Fetal cytomegalovirus syndrome

Overview

What is Fetal Cytomegalovirus Syndrome?

Fetal cytomegalovirus syndrome is a condition that occurs when an infant is infected with a virus called cytomegalovirus (CMV) before birth. Some infants born with fetal cytomegalovirus syndrome may present with a variety of symptoms including liver and spleen problems, central nervous system (CNS) problems, and vision or hearing loss. However, most infants born with a congenital CMV infection will not have any symptoms.

References
  • https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001343.htm
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Are there other abbreviations for Fetal Cytomegalovirus Syndrome?

Are there other names for Fetal Cytomegalovirus Syndrome?

How common is Fetal Cytomegalovirus Syndrome?

What is cytomegalovirus (CMV)?

How is cytomegalovirus (CMV) spread?

Who is at an increased risk for a cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection?

What steps can I take to help prevent infection of cytomegalovirus (CMV)?

How can I find out if I am infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV)?

Are there other abbreviations for Fetal Cytomegalovirus Syndrome?

Cytomegalovirus is commonly abbreviated as CMV, so fetal cytomegalovirus syndrome may also be shortened to Fetal CMV.

Are there other names for Fetal Cytomegalovirus Syndrome?

Fetal cytomegalovirus syndrome may also be called congenital CMV.

References
  • http://mothertobaby.org/fact-sheets/cytomegalovirus-cmv-pregnancy/
How common is Fetal Cytomegalovirus Syndrome?

About 1 in every 150 children born have a congenital CMV infection. And about 1 in every 5 children born with congenital CMV infections will develop permanent problems.

References
  • http://www.cdc.gov/cmv/overview.html
What is cytomegalovirus (CMV)?

Cytomegalovirus, or CMV, is a common virus that can affect people of all ages. Most people infected with CMV will never have any symptoms. Once an individual has been infected with the virus it stays in your body for life, but most immune systems can keep the virus in check.

References
  • http://mothertobaby.org/fact-sheets/cytomegalovirus-cmv-pregnancy/
How is cytomegalovirus (CMV) spread?

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is spread from person to person through contact with bodily fluids like saliva, semen, blood, urine, tears, feces, or breast milk. A pregnant woman can also pass CMV to her unborn baby.

References
  • http://mothertobaby.org/fact-sheets/cytomegalovirus-cmv-pregnancy/
Who is at an increased risk for a cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection?

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common virus; so many people can be exposed. Those who work in day-care centers, or who are around toddlers and young children are more likely to come in contact with CMV.

References
  • http://mothertobaby.org/fact-sheets/cytomegalovirus-cmv-pregnancy/
What steps can I take to help prevent infection of cytomegalovirus (CMV)?

The best way to prevent infection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) is to practice good hygiene. Washing hands after changing diapers or coming into contact with other bodily fluids is always recommended. Pregnant women should refrain from sharing food, drink, and eating utensils.

References
  • http://mothertobaby.org/fact-sheets/cytomegalovirus-cmv-pregnancy/
How can I find out if I am infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV)?

A simple blood test can determine if you have been infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV). This blood test tests for the presence or absence of antibodies against the CMV virus. If the antibodies are present, then an individual has been exposed to CMV before. Women who are planning on becoming pregnant should ideally get tested before conceiving.

References
  • http://mothertobaby.org/fact-sheets/cytomegalovirus-cmv-pregnancy/

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