Familial medullary thyroid carcinoma

Overview

What's familial medullary thyroid carcinoma?

Familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) is a cancer predisposition condition that greatly increases the risk to develop thyroid cancer as an adult and somewhat increases the risk (less than 5%) of developing the other specific endocrine tumors. FTMC is caused by changes (mutations) in the RET gene or the NTRK1 gene. These gene change can be passed down from a parent or occur in a specific individual for the first time. FTMC is considered a type of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2) a hereditary endocrine cancer syndrome.

References
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What else is familial medullary thyroid carcinoma called?

How many people have familial medullary thyroid carcinoma?

What is familial medullary thyroid carcinoma called by doctors?

Is familial medullary thyroid carcinoma more common in certain races/ethnicities?

What's the usual abbreviation for familial medullary thyroid carcinoma?

What type of syndrome is familial medullary thyroid carcinoma?

What else is familial medullary thyroid carcinoma called?

Familial medullary thyroid carcinoma is also called "familial medullary thyroid cancer" and is abbreviated "FMTC." FTMC is considered a type of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2) a hereditary endocrine cancer syndrome.

References
How many people have familial medullary thyroid carcinoma?

Familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC) is a rare form of thyroid cancer accounting for less than 1% of all thyroid cancers. FTMC is considered a type of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) a hereditary endocrine cancer syndrome. The total prevalence of MEN2 variants is approximately 1/35,000 and FMTC accounts for 10-20% of that total.

References
What is familial medullary thyroid carcinoma called by doctors?

Doctors most often call familial medullary thyroid carcinoma by its full name "familial medullary thyroid carcinoma" or "familial medullary thyroid cancer." Doctors may refer to familial medullary thyroid carcinoma as part of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) spectrum.

References
Is familial medullary thyroid carcinoma more common in certain races/ethnicities?

Familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) is not, as a syndrome, more common in certain ethnicities or populations; however, there are gene mutations in the RET gene seen more frequently in Portugal, Brazil, and Greece.

References
  • Figlioli G, Landi S, Romei C, Elisei R, Gemignani F. Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and RET proto-oncogene: Mutation spectrum in the familial cases and a meta-analysis of studies on the sporadic form. Mutat Res. 2013;752:36-44. Retrieved on January 16, 2019 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23059849
  • Wells SA Jr, Pacini F, Robinson BG, Santoro M. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma: an update. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013;98:3149-64. Retrieved from PubMed on January 31, 2019 at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23744408
  • Machens A, Geographic epidemiology of medullary thyroid cancer families: unearthing European ancestral heritage Endocrine related cancer. 2018. https://erc.bioscientifica.com/view/journals/erc/25/4/ERC-17-0514.xml
What's the usual abbreviation for familial medullary thyroid carcinoma?

The typical abbreviation for familial medullary thyroid carcinoma is FMTC.

References
  • Accessed on November 13, 2019: GeneReviews, Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2; Charis Eng, MD, PhD, FACP (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1257/)
What type of syndrome is familial medullary thyroid carcinoma?

Familial medullary thyroid carcinoma is considered a cancer syndrome as it it is associated with a significantly increased risk for thyroid cancer and a moderately increased risk (~5%) of developing the other specific endocrine tumors.

References

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