Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

Treatment

My child has just been diagnosed with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Now what?

To establish the disease severity and individualized needs of the person diagnosed with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), baseline tests and repeat tests are recommended and include:

  • physical examination
  • detailed family history
  • electrocardiogram (ECG)
  • signal averaged electrocardiogram (ECG) with 40mHz filter
  • echocardiogram
  • cardiac Magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI)
  • right ventricular angiography
  • exercise stress testing
  • 30-day Holter monitoring

If you or a loved one is affected by ARVC, a cardiologist knowledgeable in ARVC should be a first stop. Management of ARVC should be personalized based on the specific results of detailed clinical and genetic investigation.

You can seek out a specialist at the Heart Rhythm Society's "Find a Specialist page at https://www.hrsonline.org/find-a-specialistor by asking your doctor for a referral to a heart and vascular institute.

References
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What treatments are available for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy?

Are there other alternatives that can help the symptoms of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy?

What should you avoid if you have arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy?

What treatments are available for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy?

Treatment for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is focused on reducing the risk of developing symptoms, managing existing health issues, and preventing complications like cardiac arrest and sudden death. Lifestyle modifications such as eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, avoiding strenuous physical activity, and quitting smoking may be recommended to reduce current and future heart issues. Prescription medications like beta blockers may be used to reduce blood pressure and decrease the amount of work the heart does on a daily basis. Implanted devices like implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) or pacemakers may be used in individuals with ARVC to control abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), identify any life-threatening arrhythmias, and deliver an electrical shock to 'reset' the heart's rhythm as needed. Heart transplantation may be considered when ARVC has progressed to right and/or biventricular heart failure.

The creation of an individualized monitoring and treatment plan for a person with ARVC is most often designed by a cardiologist and/or electrophysiologist familiar with the progression of the condition. You can seek out a specialist at the Heart Rhythm Society's "Find a Specialist page at https://www.hrsonline.org/find-a-specialist or by asking your doctor for a referral to a heart and vascular institute.

The British Heart Foundation also has an excellent brochure that describes treatments for ARVC called "Inherited heart conditions: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy". https://www.cardiomyopathy.org/downloads/information-section/bhf-booklets/arrhythmogenic-right-ventricular-cardiomyopathy.pdf.

References
Are there other alternatives that can help the symptoms of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy?

Treatments for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) designed to prevent complications like cardiac arrest and sudden death include medications, lifestyle modifications, and implanted devices. Lifestyle modifications such as eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, avoiding strenuous physical activity, and quitting smoking may be recommended to reduce the risk of arrhythmias. Prescription medications may be used to reduce blood pressure, stabilize heart rhythm, and decrease the amount of work the heart does on a daily basis. Implanted devices like implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) or pacemakers may be used in individuals with ARVC to control abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), identify any life-threatening arrhythmias, and deliver an electrical shock to 'reset' the heart's rhythm as needed. Heart transplantation may be considered when ARVC has progressed to right and/or biventricular heart failure.

The creation of an individualized monitoring and treatment plan for a person with ARVC is most often designed by a cardiologist and/or electrophysiologist familiar with the progression of the condition. You can seek out a specialist at the Heart Rhythm Society's "Find a Specialist page at https://www.hrsonline.org/find-a-specialist or by asking your doctor for a referral to a heart and vascular institute.

The British Heart Foundation also has an excellent brochure that describes treatments for ARVC called "Inherited heart conditions: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy". https://www.cardiomyopathy.org/downloads/information-section/bhf-booklets/arrhythmogenic-right-ventricular-cardiomyopathy.pdf.

References
What should you avoid if you have arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy?

Individuals with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) should avoid exposures and activities that increase the risk of arrhythmias and put extra strain on the heart. This may include:

  • strenuous physical activity
  • being overweight
  • smoking cigarettes
  • medications whose ingredients include pseudoephedrine
  • overconsumption of alcohol or caffeine
  • using of ecstasy, marijuana, cocaine, and other recreational drugs

Individuals with ARVC should always check with your pharmacist or cardiologist before taking any new medications, herbal remedies, or supplements.

The British Heart Foundation also has an excellent brochure that describes things to ARVC called "Inherited heart conditions: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy". https://www.cardiomyopathy.org/downloads/information-section/bhf-booklets/arrhythmogenic-right-ventricular-cardiomyopathy.pdf.

References

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